Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Why Nobody Can Short This Market

Central banks control the money supply. They can print infinite amounts of dollars, euros, yen or other currencies.

Actually, they don't even have to print the money, they just push buttons on their magic computers and viola! new money.

The money gets circulated to their stockholders, large international banks. The banks invest in the stock market, sending stocks - any stock they choose, or all of them - higher.

That's why, as evidenced by today's out-of-nowhere rally, nobody can short this market.

It's easy money, mostly for the richest of the rich, and, if one is savvy enough and holds long enough without wavering, for everybody.

At the Close, Tuesday, November 21, 2017:
Dow: 23,590.83, +160.50 (+0.69%)
NASDAQ: 6,862.48, +71.76 (+1.06%)
S&P 500: 2,599.03, +16.89 (+0.65%)
NYSE Composite: 12,385.89, +65.11 (+0.53%)

Monday, November 20, 2017

Stocks Ignore Political Risks, China Regulations; Glint App Takes Gold Digital

Early morning in Europe and the Western Hemisphere were looking downright dreary to open the week's financial escapades, until buyers (central banks) emerged from the shadows (crypts), quickly erasing concerns over China's new rules to crimp the burgeoning shadow banking uprising and the failure of German Chancellor Angela Merkel to form a coalition government.

While futures were down sharply - especially on the European news - they were quickly corrected. China's markets quickly went from negative, staging a day-long rally, while European bourses were mostly positive and US stocks rallied sharply from the opening bell.

However, the euphoria flagged in the US as the session wore on, with stocks finishing off their highs of the day. Still, the results were much more cheerful than what might have happened if markets and investors were left alone, barring the blatant interventionism that seems to pervade trading in all markets.

The new paradigm is such that stocks cannot fail, but only go higher, valuations be damned, while gold and silver are routinely taken out to the woodshed for a weekly beating, such as occurred this morning, prior to the opening bell on Wall Street and throughout the day.

The setup isn't all so new at all. Since 2012, gold and silver have been mercilessly suppressed, to the point at which some staunch supporters are rethinking their love for shiny metals. This is exactly what central bankers wish, that wealth protectors give up and resign themselves to the fiat money regimen, but it is also precisely the time - if one is guided by sound investment stratagems - to begin loading up on what most would be shunning.

In that regard, London-based Glint launched a mobile app today that sets gold sailing into the digital age, offering Glintpay as a means by which to hold gold in a Swiss-based vault with the ability to spend one's holdings via a complementary MasterCard.

The app, which is available for download through the Apple App Store, works on iPhones and iPads using Apple's iOS operating system and is promising to provide quick and easy debit access to gold and a host of other currencies, with millions of locations worldwide accepting MasterCard.

How well the start-up will fare is an open question, but it does raise an interesting alternative to Bitcoin and other cryptocurrencies, which have witnessed monumental growth over the past six months and continue to raise eyebrows in the conventional banking universe.

The world is at a crossroads in terms of currencies. Trust in the debt-slavery central bank system continues to wane in various places as the rise of cryptos offers a glimpse of a possible future and precious metal devotees cling to long-held beliefs in money that is backed by physical assets.

Currency events are historically long-winded affairs, taking years or decades in which to sort themselves out. The ongoing forays between fiat, crypto, and physical seems to have gained some momentum today.

Investors with an eye on the global financial landscape would be wise to hold some of each, allocating more toward the digital and physical as events warrant as old systems are dying and may have been dealt an unrecoverable blow during the Great Financial Crisis of 2007-09.

At the Close, Monday, November 20, 2017:
Dow: 23,430.33, +72.09 (+0.31%)
NASDAQ: 6,790.71, +7.92 (+0.12%)
S&P 500: 2,582.14, +3.29 (+0.13%)
NYSE Composite: 12,320.77, +17.88 (+0.15%)

Sunday, November 19, 2017

US Equites In Danger Zone After Very Volatile Week

The US economy isn't exactly on its back, but it also isn't growing by the phony 3+ percent the government reported in the past two quarters.

Speaking strictly from an economist's perspective, the US government GDP figures include grossly-inflated government spending and just about every spare dollar their statisticians can unearth from the mainland, Alaska and Hawaii.

GDP-watching is a Wall Street phenomena, serving the interests of the corporatists who need to return dividends or share growth to stockholders. Thus, it adds impetus to the argument that investing in US corporations is a good idea. That may or may not be true, depending largely upon which corporation is attracting the investing dollars.

Obviously, the FAANGs (Facebook (FB), Apple (AAPL), Amazon (AMZN), Netflix (NFLX), and Google (Alphabet, GOOG) have been the most attractive of the past six to eight years, while quite a few have faltered. Most of the stocks making gains since the GFC of 2007-09 have been the result of massive stock buybacks, a dubious distinction, as these high-fliers are the ones most prone to collapse in the case of a market rout.

They've diluted their shares and have deployed capital in one of the worst ways, buying back shares in order to boost EPS (earnings per share). Having fewer shares available while keeping profits at roughly the same level improves EPS, but it does not expand the business potential. Banks and financials are especially guilty in this regard. They're over-leveraged and will pay a price, but their executives and shareholders are happy little clams, for now.

When the share price falls, and dividends are slashed, the shareholders will be singing a different tune. The executives will be long gone because they've proven to care only about their own pockets and bonuses.

In any case, stocks ran through a very volatile week, punctuated by a massive dead-cat-bounce rally on Thursday which stanched some of the losses incurred since all-time highs the previous Tuesday.

There could be a waterfall effect developing, because confidence is waning. The holiday shopping season - which is demonstrably longer than last year's - should provide a boost, but the economy is lurching closer to two important events: the December Fed meeting and the expected rate hike, and another round of negotiations in congress over the debt ceiling limit, both mid-month.

Elsewhere, oil remains at elevated levels, above $55/barrel for WTI crude, gold and silver were bounced around but appear ready for a breakout (as they have too many times in the past four years, with nothing to show), bonds were flatter still.

At the Close, Friday, November 17, 2017:
Dow: 23,358.24, -100.12 (-0.43%)
NASDAQ 6,782.79, -10.50 (-0.15%)
S&P 500: 2,578.85, -6.79 (-0.26%)
NYSE Composite: 12,302.89, -0.39 (0.00%)

For the Week:
Dow: -63.97 (-0.27%)
NASDAQ: +31.85 (+0.47%)
S&P 500: -3.45 (-0.13%)
NYSE Composite: -19.71 (-0.16%)

Thursday, November 16, 2017

Stocks Rebound After Week of Losses

No reason for stocks to gain at all, probably just buying the dip, or, BTFD, if one prefers.

There's still a way to get to get back to all-time highs form last Tuesday (23,602 on the Dow), but, with Thanksgiving coming up and a shortened Black Friday always good for a holiday boost, there's a very, very good chance that stocks will resume rising, because that's all there is in this kinky investing environment.

You didn't really think the bull market was ending, did you?

The fast answer, for those paying attention, is, "it can't." Because then everything turns to mud.

At The Close, Thursday, November 16, 2017:
Dow: 23,458.36, +187.08 (+0.80%)
NASDAQ: 6,793.29, +87.08 (+1.30%)
S&P 500: 2,585.64, +21.02 (+0.82%)
NYSE Composite: 12,303.28, +82.94 (+0.68%)

Wednesday, November 15, 2017

Stocks Drubbed on Cool CPI

Stocks opened on the downside for the seventh consecutive session, only this time they did not manage a complete comeback by the close. What triggered the selloff was a tight CPI number, as the widely-watched index of US consumer prices inched up only 0.1% in October, the smallest gain in three months.

At another time in the pantheon of stock market momentum and movement, the soft inflation figure might have spurred a buying spree, as investors could gain confidence that the Fed would not raise rates in December, as is widely anticipated, but that was not the case today. The mood has changed significantly and there's a persistent pessimistic undertone that there soon could be blood in the streets.

Bonds may be calling the next move via the curve (or non-curve as the case may soon be). The spread between 5s and 30s plunged to 73 Basis Points today, the flattest since November of 2007, a key point in time, as it was then that the Great Financial Crisis (GFC) was about to unfold.

The 10-year note remains mired in the 2.30-2.38 range. A break in yield below 2.28 could be a triggering event prior to the December FOMC meeting at which the Fed is poised to raise the federal funds rate for the third time this year.

Credit is being squeezed as are margins in various industries, especially consumer retail. Amazon's foray into the grocery business via its Whole Foods acquisition may be the defining deflationary event of the decade.

As far as the indices are concerned, all eyes are on the Dow Industrials, which, after breaking to an all-time high last Tuesday, have done nothing but drift lower, though the flight path has been gradual... until today.

At the close today, the blue chips have shed 331 points, or about 1.4% since the high reached on November 7.

At the Close, Wednesday, November 15, 2017:
Dow: 23,271.28, -138.19 (-0.59%)
NASDAQ: 6,706.21, -31.66 (-0.47%)
S&P 500: 2,564.62, -14.25 (-0.55%)
NYSE Composite: 12,220.34, -59.77 (-0.49%)

Tuesday, November 14, 2017

Stocks Under Pressure; Bulls All Die At Some Point

Anybody who believes that this current bull market - fueled by easy money policies from central banks, fake statistics, and enormous government deficits - will continue much longer needs to take a reality check.

Just for those who cannot or will not see the forest for the trees, the following:

  • The 10-year-note is stuck in a perpetual yield range of 2.3-something.
  • Stocks have been going sideways for week.
  • There's almost no chance that the congress will pass any kind of tax reform bill this year as they are doing nothing more than posturing for the midterm elections.
  • The national debt continues to soar to new heights, despite happy talk from the administration (remember, congress holds the purse-strings).
  • The percentage of people in the workforce is still at near-record lows.
  • The Us trade deficit with China is not shrinking.
  • State pension plans and many private pension plans are underfunded by trillions of dollars.
  • Voting doesn't matter (see the fiasco over Roy Moore)
  • Corporate profits are beginning to show serious signs of a slowdown (GE, Chipolte, others)
  • Foreclosures, bankruptcies, student loan defaults are rising.

That is just a sampling, and today's market, in form with the past few sessions, took a nosedive at the open only to recover thanks to spirited heavy lifting by the PPT or central bank cronies on the heaviest volume in five months.

The Dow was down 168 points shortly after 10:00 am ET, only to close with a marginal loss. Even at its lowest point, the index was 900 points above its 50-day moving average.

Stocks are as overpriced as they've ever been, setting up for a crash of enormous proportions.

It's coming, but nobody knows when or why it will occur. The Fed is still insistent upon raising interest rates again in December, at a time at which the economy is neither growing fast enough to warrant such behavior nor robust enough to withstand repeated rate hikes.

Over the years, the Federal Reserve has caused more crashes and recessions than it will admit. Uncontrollable spending by government and cascading business and individual debt is reaching unprecedented heights, worse than preceding the Great Financial Crisis of 2007-09.

Extreme caution is advised.


At the Close, Tuesday, November 14, 2017:
Dow: 23,409.47, -30.23 (-0.13%)
NASDAQ: 6,737.87, -19.72 (-0.29%)
S&P 500: 2,578.87, -5.97 (-0.23%)
NYSE Composite: 12,280.11, -36.71 (-0.30%)

Monday, November 13, 2017

Stocks Stumble Early, Rally for Minor Gains; GE Tumbles, Halves Dividend

Stocks continue to show weakness on a day-to-day basis, with implicit underpinning via central bank purchases, much as was the case today as General Electric (GE) posted horrifying third quarter numbers which cost the stock more than seven percent of its market capitalization [19.02, -1.47 (-7.17%)].

The company cut its annual dividend in half, from $0.24 to $0.12, and announced a broad-based restructuring, shedding up to $20 billion of its core assets.

Jeff Immelt, former CEO and Chairman of the Board, had been under pressure from investors to make changes until his ouster just weeks ago.

There's speculation that General Electric could be bounced from the Dow Jones Industrial Average, a position its held since November 7, 1907, having fallen by as much as 35% in the past year while the overall market has posted strong gains. GE is the oldest continuous member of the blue chip index.

GE's hammering at the open no doubt contributed to the dour mood in the early going, but stocks regained their footing and gradually advanced throughout the somewhat lackluster session.

The Dow closed at a new all-time high last Tuesday, but has been subdued since. With the year of 2017 drawing to a close and many fund managers closing their books (or already having done so), it will be interesting to watch the movement of the major indices over the coming weeks and through the holiday season.

Black Friday is a mere 11 days off. Gobble, gobble.

At the Close, Monday, November 13, 2017:
Dow: 23,439.70, +17.49 (+0.07%)
NASDAQ: 6,757.60, +6.66 (+0.10%)
S&P 500 2,584.84, +2.54 (+0.10%)
NYSE Composite: 12,316.83, -5.78 (-0.05%)

Saturday, November 11, 2017

Stocks Slide for Week as Wall Street Sees Little Hope for Tax Reform

For the week, the Dow Jones Industrial Average declined 0.50% finishing with its first weekly decline after eight straight weekly gains, though the blue chip index remained less than 150 points from an all-time closing high set on Wednesday, November 8.

The S&P 500 finished the week lower as well, but only marginally so. It was the S&P's first weekly decline in nine weeks. The NASDAQ posted its first weekly loss in seven weeks. Both the NASDAQ and S&P closed at record highs on Wednesday as well.

The one index that did not reach record highs during the week past was also the broadest. The NYSE Composite index closed down for the second week in the past three, but those losses were more than offset by gains in the prior six weeks.

In general, analysts blamed congress for the poor performance in equities, citing the lack of a clear path to a tax overhaul that was a cornerstone of President Trump's winning strategy of a year ago. The House and Senate both introduced measures that vary widely and seem unlikely to offer much in the way of relief for individuals or businesses. Rolled out on Thursday, the Senate version pushes for a permanent (until they change it) tax rate of 20% for corporations, but delays implementing the proposed rate until 2019.

Both versions increase the standard deduction to $12,000 for individuals and $24,000 for married couples filing joint returns, but the congress and the media fail to mention that both versions cut out the personal exemption, which was $4,050 in 2016. That leaves the net gain for most single taxpayers at $1,650, and $3,300 for couples.

The standard deduction for 2016 was $6300 for singles, and $12,600 for married couples.

With Democrats generally understood to oppose any Republican plan, the chances for passage this year of either bill remain slim. President Trump and conservative leaders in the Senate face any number of challenges from the likes of Ted Cruz, John McCain, Bob Corker and others who have either stated their opposition to the measures or are likely to vote against any changes to the intricate, pitfall-ridden federal income tax code.

As far as Wall Street is concerned, lowering the corporate tax and the tax on offshore profits are at the top of the wish list, but, little is being done to address their concerns with a congress largely already focused on being re-elected in the 2018 midterms, now less than a year away.

It has become more than obvious to most Americans that congress is an inept, bought-and-paid body, loyal only to special interests which fund their expensive campaigns. Any thoughts of providing relief to beleaguered taxpayers or companies are beyond their admittedly limited legislative scope.

Thus, investors should treat any talk of reform coming from the mouths of elected officials in Washington as nothing more than make believe rhetoric, designed solely to make themselves appear to be working when they are, in fact, not.

At the Close, Friday, November 10, 2017:
Dow: 23,422.21, -39.73 (-0.17%)
NASDAQ: 6,750.94, +0.89 (+0.01%)
S&P 500: 2,582.30, -2.32 (-0.09%)
NYSE Composite: 12,322.60, -17.06 (-0.14%)

For the Week:
Dow: -116.98 (-0.50%)
NASDAQ: -13.50 (-0.20%)
S&P 500: -5.54 (-0.21%)
NYSE Composite: -50.46 (-0.41%)

Friday, November 10, 2017

Stocks Balk at Indecisive Congressional Tax Reform Efforts

Stocks tumbled at midweek as prospects for comprehensive tax reform dimmed in Washington.

The Senate was roundly blamed for the poor performance on the session, as a handful of Republicans expressed doubts over the version of the package submitted by the House days earlier.

A Republican bill was presented, with significant changes, including a permanent 20% business tax rate which would be implemented in 2019. The delay of more than a year concerned investors, though such concern is largely a canard, being that the effective rate for most significant corporations is about 14%.

As the day wore on the pain subsided and late buying boosted averages, though not enough to offset an across-the-board decline, putting the major indices in the red for the week.

Without a positive narrative and strategy for tax reform forthcoming for the congress, it appears that President Trump will be thwarted once again in his efforts to Make American Great Again, though many may argue that his initial tax proposals fell far short of any significant, progressive changes to the tax code.

Simplification would be an effective measure towards keeping the Trump loyalists in camp, but that does not appear to be on the congressional agenda, as per usual.

There's spreading sentiment that nothing will be done in terms of tax reform, which, like Social Security, Medicare/Medicaid, and immigration, has serious problems which year after year seem to defy the ability of congress to implement meaningful change. The more convenient route of promising change and delivering nothing of consequence appears to be the overriding theme of a congress that's essentially done nothing of benefit to the general population for the past twenty years.

As far as Wall Street is concerned, Washington is more a parody, a thinly-veiled lie at effective governance and thus it is, more often than not, discounted as meaningless.

The declines of Wednesday will be considered a sign of weakness, though most will express the opinion that "it's only a flesh wound."

At the Close, Thursday, November 9, 2017:
Dow: 23,461.94, -101.42 (-0.43%)
NASDAQ: 6,750.05, -39.06 (-0.58%)
S&P 500: 2,584.62, -9.76 (-0.38%)
NYSE Composite: 12,339.66, -45.05 (-0.36%)

Wednesday, November 8, 2017

Stocks Hit Roadblock as House Tax Plan Falters in Senate

With Rand Paul absent due to injury, senators John McCain and Ted Cruz already announced no votes, the much-ballyhooed house-Trump tax plan looks to be dead on arrival and investors are not pleased.

Tuesday's action in the markets were punctuated by a pronounced leveling of the yield curve, with 2-10 and 5-30 spreads plumbing new lows.

Just in case the bickering in Washington continues towards implosion - a highly likely event horizon - with Democrats aligning with no-vote Republicans, forward looking people will next look to the upcoming December deadline for the debt ceiling and an anticipated increase to the federal funds rate by the Fed's FOMC.

That's putting pressure on stocks as the market opens Wednesday, though the declines are far from substantial. Also of note is crude oil's decline off recent three-year highs, while precious metals continue to the upside, a split in the commodity complex.

President Trump continues his extensive Pacific tour, in China for the time being, as news flow should slow to a crawl as the week closes in on Friday. With stocks fluctuating, it may be time to seek out undervalued equities, if any are to be found. Stocks remain wildly overpriced with backing by central banks preventing any potential cascading declines.

At the Close, Tuesday, November 7, 2017:
Dow: 23,557.23, +8.81 (+0.04%)
NASDAQ: 6,767.78, -18.65 (-0.27%)
S&P 500: 2,590.64, -0.49 (-0.02%)
NYSE Composite: 12,371.25, -29.68 (-0.24%)

Tuesday, November 7, 2017

Saudi Purge Prompts Higher Prices for Oil, Precious Metals

Midday Monday, the commodity complex (especially gold, silver and WTI crude oil) took off to the upside, and, by the end of the day, had maintained their newfound levels, oil hitting a nearly three-year high.

This dramatic rise in the price of oil coincides with tumultuous incidents in Saudi Arabia, wherein 11 princes, four ministers and several former ministers have been detained. Some prominent businessman have also been placed on a so-called "no fly" list, as Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman purges his enemies in an overt effort to considerate power in the kingdom.

Oil rising and Saudi unrest are not isolated events, as neither is the incidental visit by President Trump some months ago and the more recent visit by Trump advisor and son-in-law Jared Kushner.

The Saudis have seen their profits collapse as oil has languished under $50 for years, but the political shakeup may have more to do with overall foreign interests, primarily focused on investments in US companies such as Citibank and Twitter, via the kingdom's sovereign wealth fund.

Silver and gold also rising at the same time during the day as oil confirms that there was coordinated buying of commodities in the futures market. The move was far from insignificant and was presaged by a similar move to the downside in the complex on Friday, prior to the Saudi purge, which went public on Sunday.

With President Trump safely traveling in the Pacific, the intrigue is high that something major is afoot globally, recalling Trump's cryptic tweet a few weeks ago, "the calm before the storm."

It seems that the storm has arrived, at least in the middle East. Whether it continues to lash out across Europe and the United States is, at this time, still conjecture.

As has been demonstrated periodically in the past, commodity futures can be highly volatile and can have profound effects further into the supply and demand chain. If oil continues to rise, it may be time to take any number of protective measures, from purchasing a fuel-efficient vehicle, to selling the dollar, to buying precious metal in anticipation of a major - and long overdue - breakout.

While nothing in the interconnected world of finance operates in a vacuum, stocks could also feel some heat, though the markets have more than ample protection on the downside via central bank stealth and overt (Swiss National Bank) purchases.

It is apparent, however, that given the Saudi purge and the rise in the price of oil, something big is happening.

At the Close, Monday, November 6, 2017:
Dow: 23,548.42, +9.23 (+0.04%)
NASDAQ: 6,786.44, +22.00 (+0.33%)
S&P 500: 2,591.13, +3.29 (+0.13%)
NYSE Composite: 12,400.93, +27.87 (+0.23%)

Friday, November 3, 2017

Trump Nominates Jerome Powell As Fed Chair; Goldman Sachs Execs Happy

Some equities responded with favor to President Trump's nomination of ultimate insider, Jerome Powell, to the chairmanship of the Federal Reserve.

Without so much as the batting of a single eyelash, Goldman Sachs (GS), Microsoft (MSFT), McDonald's (MCD), Boeing (BA), and JP Morgan Chase (JPM) led the Dow to yet another record high, mainly upon the notion that Powell would continue to easy money and lax regulatory environment so loved by Wall Street.

It would be easy to point the finger at Mr. Trump for appeasing the status quo, though it might not be an accurate assessment of the situation. The president is smart enough to know that keeping Wall Street happy and profitable has a profound effect on his standing within the business community and promoting a life-long lawyer (not an economist) and financier with multiple ties to various private and public money machines goes a long way toward keeping the Fed on its current track (Powell has not cast a dissenting FOMC vote in his five years as a voting member.

There could be worse environments than the current regime controlling the global economy, though it is difficult to think of one that could compare with the outright rigging and asset-prompting the central banks have engaged in over the past ten years. In case one was not in complete agreement and chose not to engage in one of the longest and best-maintained bull markets in history, the past is prologue and the nomination of Powell ensures a smooth transition to the Fed's top post. More of the same would seem to be the open dialogue of the day.

Keeping the rich rich and the middle and lower classes entertained, while not the optimal policy directive, has served to keep the system afloat, despite its various warts, bruises and open wounds.

Much of finance is done behind closed doors and it's probably a good thing, because were the wicked deals to be generally known by the public, riotous behavior might ensue. Keeping the Fed on an even keel will likely result in ever higher prices for stocks and a more complacent (if that is even possible with the VIX hovering around 10) investment community.

What could go wrong?

At the Close, Thursday, November 2, 2017:
Dow: 23,516.26: +81.25 (+0.35%)
NASDAQ: 6,714.9429, -1.59 (-0.02%)
S&P 500: 2,579.85, +0.49 (+0.02%)
NYSE Composite: 12,372.96, +10.08 (+0.08%)

Thursday, November 2, 2017

FOMC Leaves Rates Unchanged; Markets Respond Positively

The Federal Reserve's FOMC issued their policy statement at 2:00 pm ET, after a two-day meeting that was widely anticipated to keep the federal funds rate unchanged at 1.00-1.25%.

What the Fed did change in its statement was a few words which piqued the interest of the bullish crowd on Wall Street, saying that the US economy was displaying "solid" growth over the past few months, a change from their use of the word "moderate" or "moderately" to describe US economic growth.

That was enough for investors to snap up a few more mostly overpriced shares on the first day November, except on the NASDAQ, which was the one index to end the session at a loss.

The Fed is prepared to raise interest rates in December, boosting the federal funds rate to 1.25-1.50%, a level still well below what most economists consider normal and sustainable.

At the Close, Wednesday, November 1, 2017:
Dow: 23,435.01, +57.77 (+0.25%)
NASDAQ: 6,716.53, -11.14 (-0.17%)
S&P 500: 2,579.36, +4.10 (+0.16%)
NYSE Composite: 12,362.88, +21.87 (+0.18%)

Wednesday, November 1, 2017

Stocks End October on High Note: Fed's FOMC on Deck

With no rate hike expected from the ongoing FOMC meeting this week, investors tacked on small gains as October came to a close.

In what was a sluggish session, the main indices limped higher, awaiting jobs data later in the week and the unveiling of some kind of tax bill from congress.

The Fed will release its policy announcement at 2:00 pm ET on Wednesday, though most analysts insist there will be little to motivate buyers or sellers.

At the Close, Tuesday, October 31, 2017:
Dow: 23,377.24, +28.50 (+0.12%)
NASDAQ: 6,727.67, +28.71 (+0.43%)
S&P 500: 2,575.26, +2.43 (+0.09%)
NYSE Composite: 12,341.01, +21.54 (+0.17%)